Overcoming Childhood Myths and Conditioning is not Easy

This week I have been reflecting on the Islamic traditions that have been bred into me from childhood and how my adult self can see logically that some of these rituals are myths but still finds it hard to shake off the conditioning.

I didn’t have a very traditional Muslim upbringing as both of my parents stood out from their community in being forward thinking and questioning about all aspects of life. Yet even within this progressive environment some dogma was passed on which stays with me to this day. I wonder what it must be like for children growing up in more conservative households, where their faith is set out for them with certainty without any room for debate. Could this be one of the factors that render young men and women vulnerable to radicalisation?

The media is in meltdown at the moment trying to analyse what could have turned Mohammed Emwazi into the monstrous “Jihadi John” we have seen in the appalling ISIS beheading videos, or what could have compelled young teenage girls to leave their families and head for Syria. Personally, I think you have to have a screw loose somewhere to enjoy slitting another person’s throat so perhaps we are all wasting our time trying to understand Emwazi’s motivation. Let’s not give this fanatic any more publicity than he already has.

However, the numbers of Muslims living in the west who have left the comfort of their homes to join the fight in Syria or elsewhere in the Middle East is significant enough for questions to be asked about what makes them want to do it. They can’t all be psychopaths or thugs. Many come from stable family backgrounds and are grade “A” students. While there are no easy answers to this question one common thread seems to be that at one point or another these people have come under the influence of charismatic preachers, whether in mosques or online through social media. I am struck by the very dogmatic language used by the jihadis that have posted videos and messages online. It feels almost like they are parroting what has been preached to them.

Could it be that people who from childhood are taught religion in certainties rather than in shades of grey are more susceptible to the influence of others? Obviously many other factors would have to come into play to bring about radicalisation. I am certainly not putting forward the idea that a conservative upbringing is to blame for all this. I am just trying to address one of the factors which I think does make a difference. And that is the lack of development of independent thinking. Young people need to learn not to accept things just because they are told but to make their own journey and reach their own conclusions. Their faith will be the better for it.

I have lost count of the times people have said to me that I am not learned enough to make a judgement, that I have to trust what the religious scholars tell me. They have spent years reading all the religious texts whereas I only know a dozen or so surahs of the Qur’an by heart. If they say so then it must be true.

So they tell me I must always eat and drink with my right hand, not my left. When I cleanse myself before prayer, I must always follow the ritual of washing my limbs three times on each side (starting with the right of course). When I pray in the privacy of my home I must cover every single hair on my head although it’s alright for my brother to show God his hair.

Now I am a grown up and can think for myself. I sometimes drink with my left hand if it is more convenient but I always get a little frisson of doing something naughty. I try not to be too dogmatic about the Wudu’ ritual but somehow can’t stop myself from washing my arm three times on the right then doing the same on the left. I have tried to pray in my bedroom without a headscarf but each time I have felt very awkward so I have reverted to the traditional head covering when I pray even though both my heart and my head tell me that God does not care about these trivialities only that I approach my prayer with pure intentions. Conditioning is hard to overcome.

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